Worder - English dictionary
Worder Dictionary

All English words - page 5573

Meanings of Take-over:

phrasal verb

Seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession

Meanings of Take-part:

idiom

To support someone

Usage examples:

For once, my brother took my part in the argument., she doesn't usually take part in any of the cla…

Meanings of Take-part-in:

idiom

To be actively involved in something with other people

Usage examples:

All the children took part in the thanksgiving play.

Meanings of Take-pity-on:

phrase

To feel sorry for someone, and to do something that shows this

Usage examples:

We took pity on a couple of people waiting in the rain for a bus and gave them a lift., i struggled…

Meanings of Take-place:

phrase

Come to pass

phrasal verb

To like something or someone

Usage examples:

We took to our new neighbors very quickly., he didn’t take kindly to the manager’s insisting that h…

Meanings of Take-possession-of:

phrase

To start to use and control something such as a building or piece of land that you may or may not own

Usage examples:

We've already bought the house but we won't take possession of it until may., if they can't pay the…

Meanings of Take-pride-in:

phrase

To feel very pleased about something or someone you are closely connected with

Usage examples:

If you don't take professional pride in your work, you're probably in the wrong job., the new coach…

Meanings of Take-prisoner:

phrase

To catch and guard someone so that they cannot escape

Usage examples:

Of 10,000 troops, 7,000 were killed, wounded, or taken prisoner., the pilot and several passengers …

Meanings of Take-round:

phrasal verb

To walk through a building or visit a place with someone, showing them the most interesting or important parts

Usage examples:

You will be taken round the museum by one of the guides.

Meanings of Take-shape:

idiom

To start to develop a more clear or certain form

Usage examples:

We watched the vase begin to take shape in the potter's hands., our ideas are beginning to take sha…

Meanings of Take-something-amiss:

phrase

To be offended by something that someone has said to you

Usage examples:

I was worried that he might take my remark amiss., i hope you won't take it amiss if i say goodbye …

Meanings of Take-something-lying-down:

idiom

To complain about a situation rather than accepting it

Usage examples:

I can’t take that criticism lying down.

Meanings of Take-something-personally:

phrase

To think that someone is offending you when they are not

Usage examples:

These criticisms should not be taken personally (= they are not meant to criticize any one person i…

Meanings of Take-stock-of:

idiom

To examine a situation carefully

Usage examples:

After the storm homeowners came out to take stock of the damage.

Meanings of Take-the-bait:

idiom

To react to something said or offered

Usage examples:

I told my sister i'd lend her my new shirt if she let me borrow her jacket, but she didn't take the…

Meanings of Take-the-chill-off:

idiom

To make something slightly less cold

Usage examples:

We lit the fire to take the chill off the room.

Meanings of Take-the-edge-off:

idiom

To make something unpleasant have less of an effect on someone

Usage examples:

Have an apple - it'll take the edge off your hunger., his apology took the edge off her anger.

Meanings of Take-the-field:

phrase

To go onto the field at the start of a game

Usage examples:

There were loud cheers as the irish team took the field., they will take the field next week agains…

Meanings of Take-the-liberty-of:

idiom

To do something that will have an effect on someone else, without asking their permission

Usage examples:

I took the liberty of booking theatre seats for us.

Meanings of Take-the-mickey-out-of:

phrase

To laugh at someone and make them seem silly, in a funny or unkind way

Usage examples:

A group of other boys were taking the mickey out of him., she's always taking the mick - she's got …

Meanings of Take-the-piss-out-of:

idiom

To make a joke about someone or make someone look silly

Usage examples:

They're always taking the piss out of him because he's a barry manilow fan.

Meanings of Take-the-place-of:

phrase

To be used instead of someone or something

Usage examples:

These portable machines can take the place of your desktop pc., virtual reality should never take t…

Meanings of Take-the-plunge:

idiom

To decide to do something, esp. after thinking about it for a long time

Usage examples:

They took the plunge and got married last month.

Meanings of Take-the-time:

idiom

To make the effort to do something

Usage examples:

Take the time to she didn't even take the time to wish me good morning.

Meanings of Take-the-wind-out-of-someones-sails:

phrase

Frustrate someone by unexpectedly anticipating an action or remark.

Usage examples:

This tiny bit of information took the wind out of my sails.
idiom

To make someone feel less confident or less determined to do something, usually by saying or doing something that they are not expecting

Usage examples:

I was all ready to tell him that the relationship was over when he greeted me with a big bunch of f…

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